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Terry A. BLAIR

 
 
 
 
 

 

 

 

 
 
 
Classification: Serial killer
Characteristics: Rape
Number of victims: 7 - 9
Date of murders: 1982 / June-September 2004
Date of arrest: September 10, 2004
Date of birth: September 16, 1961
Victims profile: His pregnant ex-girlfriend, Angela Monroe / Sheliah McKinzie, 38; Anna Ewing, 42; Patricia Wilson Butler, 45; Darci I. Williams, 25; Carmen Hunt, 40; and Claudette Juniel, 31
Method of murder: Strangulation
Location: Kansas City, Missouri, USA
Status: Sentenced to 25 years imprisonment in 1982. Paroled in 2003. Sentenced to life in prison with no possibility of parole in March 2008
 
 
 
 
 
 

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Terry Blair (born September 16, 1961) is an American serial killer, who raped and killed at least seven women in Kansas City, Missouri.

Family history

Terry Blair was born into a family which would have many encounters with the criminal justice system. He was the fourth eldest of 10 siblings, born to a mother who had only finished the 9th grade and suffered from mental illness.

While in jail for a separate incident, brother Walter Blair Jr met a man who offered to pay him $6,000 to kill Katherine Jo Allen so she could not testify at his rape trial. Blair confessed to abducting Allen from her apartment before taking her to a vacant lot and shooting her. He was convicted of murder and was executed in 1993.

Half brother Clifford Miller was convicted in the 1992 abduction of a woman from a bar. He shot the woman in the arm and drove her to an abandoned house before raping her repeatedly and beating her until she passed out. She suffered a gunshot wound, fractured skull, broken jaw and broken cheek bones. She spent two months in the hospital, recovering. Clifford Miller was sentenced to two life sentences plus 240 years for charges including kidnapping and forcible sodomy.

Mother Janice Blair fatally shot Elton E. Gray, but was sentenced to probation after entering an Alford plea.

Terry Blair had already spent 21 years incarcerated for murdering Angela Monroe, the pregnant mother of his two children, prior to being charged with these additional six murders. According to court records he was angry with her for performing acts of prostitution. Incidentally, Blair was released from prison for two months committing his second murder after Monroe before heading back to prison for a parole violation.

Crimes

Below is the list of victims Terry Blair was convicted of killing:

  • Angela Monroe

  • Anna Ewing, 42, died on or before July 14, 2004, due to strangulation and a broken neck.

  • Patricia Wilson Butler, 58, died on or before September 2, 2004, due to strangulation

  • Sheliah McKinzie, 38, died on or before September 2, 2004, due to strangulation and a broken neck

  • Darci I. Williams, 25, died on or before September 4, 2004, due to strangulation and a broken neck

  • Carmen Hunt, 40, died on or before September 4, 2004, due to strangulation

  • Claudette Juniel, 31, died on or before September 4, 2004, due to strangulation and a broken neck

Blair was also accused in two other murders (Sandra Reed and Nellia Harris), an assault, and three rapes.

Trial and imprisonment

On October 15, 2004, Terry Blair was charged with eight counts of first-degree murder, one count of first-degree assault, and three counts of forcible rape.

Blair avoided the death penalty by agreeing to waive his right to a jury trial. He was sentenced to 25 years imprisonment for the murder of his first known victim, Angela Monroe. After being released early (after 21 years) he was convicted of killing six more women. For these additional six murders he was sentenced to life in prison with no possibility of parole.

Blair is currently housed in the Potosi Correctional Center in Mineral Point, Missouri.

Trivia

The case of the seven homicides he was convicted of is featured in the episode "A Serial Killer Calls" of the TV show The First 48. The episode follows detectives as they receive information of the death of the first woman all the way up until his capture.

Wikipedia.org

 
 

Terry Blair guilty in deaths of six women

By Joe Lambe - The Kansas City Star

Mar. 27, 2008

A judge today found Terry Blair guilty in the deaths of six women whose bodies were found in the Prospect Avenue corridor in 2003 and 2004.

Jackson County Circuit Judge John O’Malley found Blair, 46, guilty of first-degree murder in the deaths of Sheliah McKinzie, 38; Anna Ewing, 42; Patricia Wilson Butler, 45; Darci I. Williams, 25; Carmen Hunt, 40; and Claudette Juniel, 31.

The only possible sentence is life without parole on each charge.

The verdicts in the non-jury trial end a case that began with 911 cell phone calls to police on Sept. 3 and Sept. 4, 2004. The caller told police he killed two women whose bodies had just been found and four others.

He told them where to find three of the bodies and had some details only the killer would know.

The man who called himself Scott said he did it because they were prostitutes, “scum, a disgrace.”

Police arrested Blair within weeks of the calls after his DNA matched semen in and on victim Sheliah McKinzie. In more than seven hours of interrogation, Blair denied knowing McKinzie or having sex with her and confessed to nothing.

At trial this month, defense lawyers contended his DNA proved nothing because hairs, saliva or semen from other men were on McKinzie or other victims.

But in closing arguments last week, assistant prosecutor Michael Hunt reminded the judge that a former prostitute told police before the 911 calls that Blair said he was killing all the prostitutes one by one.

And the mother of one victim, he said, last saw her alive when she dropped her daughter off to meet with Blair and two other men. And a teen witness, Hunt said, testified that Blair told her that whoever was killing the women probably had a good reason.

Hunt also noted that even a defense expert said the voice on the 911 calls was that of an African-American man raised in the United States.

With all the evidence, he said, “the finger points to Terry Blair.”

Defense lawyer Cynthia Dryden attacked the evidence as too unreliable and too little to convict. She noted that authorities never proved Blair made the 911 calls and said prosecutors had to do that.

“If they can’t,” she said, “they cannot convict.”

Before trial, prosecutors made a deal with Blair to drop charges for two other murders, three rapes and an assault. In exchange for that and for prosecutors dropping the death penalty, Blair agreed to trial before O’Malley without a jury.

 
 

Blair Found Guilty On All Murder Counts

Judge Criticizes Police For Media Coverage

KMBC.com

March 27, 2008

KANSAS CITY, Mo.A judge convicted a man Thursday of killing six women whose bodies were dumped along the Prospect Corridor, an area frequented by prostitutes and drug dealers.

Terry Blair, 46, was found guilty of six counts of first-degree murder in the 2004 slayings. But Jackson County Circuit Judge John R. O'Malley acknowledged the case was full of conflicting expert testimony and "small pieces of circumstantial evidence."

Blair had agreed to be tried before a judge instead of jury in return for prosecutors agreeing not to pursue the death penalty. He is to be sentenced to life in prison at an April 24 hearing.

Prosecutors described Blair as calculating and determined to kill as many prostitutes as he could. At least one women had been strangled, but the causes of death of the other women could not be determined because their bodies had decomposed so badly.

Upon hearing the verdict, Blair lowered his eyes to the table while family members of his victims hugged and cried in the gallery behind him. Blair's attorneys left without speaking to reporters.

"I knew from the beginning that it would come out this way because the truth will always survive over lies and evil," said Irene Williams, mother of victim Darci Williams. "You could look in his eyes, and it's a blankness. But when he looks at a woman, it's an evil look. It's just like hatred."

Williams, who has cancer, said she feels at peace with the case.

"What time I have now, I know that justice has been served. Even here on earth he may not get all he deserves, but he will get it in the hereafter," Williams said.

Relatives of other victims said Williams became known as a kind of grandma to the families. The relatives grew close during this long ordeal, which included constant reminders of their loved one's high-risk lifestyles.

"I'm her daughter. She was somebody's mother. They weren't prostitutes, drug addicts -- they were somebody's mother. They were women," said Trish Davis, daughter of victim Patricia Wilson Butler.

Prosecutors showed that Blair's semen was found on the body of victim Sheliah McKinzie and presented evidence they said showed Blair may have been the one who called 911 to tell police where to find the bodies of victims.

Blair has denied involvement in the killings and his defense attorneys said the evidence against him was weak and circumstantial. For example, they said the semen found on McKinzie proves Blair had sex with her, not that he killed her.

But O'Malley said the placement of semen indicated McKinzie hadn't moved or attempted to clean herself after having sex.

"Since we know this semen belonged to Mr. Blair we must conclude he was present as Ms. McKinzie expired, her throat crushed by his hands and by his irrational, evil hatred of women," he said.

In addition to McKinzie, 38, Williams, 25, and Butler, 45, the victims were: Anna Ewing, 42; Carmen Hunt, 40; and Claudette Juniel, 31.

Charges against Blair in two other slayings -- those of Nellia Harris, 33, and Sandra Reed, 47 -- were dismissed in October. Harris, unlike the other victims, was killed in 2003.

Blair also had been charged in three rapes and an assault that involved four victims who survived their attacks. Those charges also were dropped.

Blair was arrested in September 2004 when he was on parole for the 1982 murder of his pregnant ex-girlfriend, Angela Monroe, who was the mother of two of his children. He had served 21 years in prison.

KMBC's Peggy Breit reported that before announcing the verdict, the judge criticized the Kansas City Police Department for its media coverage of the case. The Blair investigation was featured on the cable program "The First 48" on A&E.

The show followed Kansas City detectives as they discovered the women's bodies. A clip of the 7 1/2-hour interrogation appeared on the show. Defense attorneys fought to throw out the interrogation, but the judge decided it did not violate Blair's constitutional rights to a fair trial.

The judge said the police officers should be more concerned about solving crimes rather than television.

"I respectfully suggest, if you don't want problems, you need to pursue the criminals instead of the cameras," O'Malley said.

He also said mistakes were caused by the presence of the cameras, and the sometimes shoddy policework allowed the defense to effectively dispute evidence.

 
 

Closing arguments made in Terry Blair trial

Jenn Strathman - NBCActionNews.com

March 21, 2008

KANSAS CITY, Mo. – The fate of accused serial killer Terry Blair now lies in the hands of a Jackson County judge.

Closing arguments were held in the trial Friday.

Blair is charged with killing six women who worked as prostitutes. Their bodies were found along the Prospect Corridor in 2004.

Charges against Blair in two other slayings were dismissed by Jackson County Circuit Judge John R. O'Malley in October.

Blair agreed to a non-jury trial in exchange for prosecutors not seeking the death penalty. Prosecutors also earlier agreed to dismiss charges against Blair in the two other killings, three rapes and an assault.

The prosecution alleged Blair killed the six women because he thought all prostitutes were scum, showing pictures of the six women killed and describing how each one was killed.

Earlier in the trial, a former prostitute testified that Blair once told her he wanted to "kill all prostitutes."

Jackson County Prosecutor Michael Hunt said Blair's DNA was found on the women and is the link to the killer.

But the defense argued that hairs and DNA also left links to others. "Some of this DNA is not [Blair's]," defense attorney Cynthia Dryden said. "When you start pulling out part and considering only some…you can make it fit whatever you want."

The defense also questioned the Kansas City Police Department's investigation, specifically how they pinpointed where 911 calls were made. Those calls played a large role in the case.

The prosecution said Blair made the calls that described in detail where the bodies of the women were hidden.

A voice analysis expert testified for the defense that the voice on the calls did not match Blair's voice patterns.

The defense said the prosecution did not prove beyond a reasonable doubt that Blair committed the murders.

 
 

Expert: Anonymous caller likely not Blair

NBCActionNews.com

March 13, 2008

KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) - The clipped, matter-of-fact voice on two 911 calls telling police where to find the bodies of five women the caller claimed to have killed is not likely the voice of the man charged in the deaths, a linguistics expert testified Thursday.

Thomas Purnell, an assistant professor of linguistics at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, testified for the defense in the fourth day of the trial for accused serial killer Terry Blair.

Blair faces first-degree murder charges in the deaths of six women whose bodies were found after an anonymous 911 caller told police in September 2004 about the bodies and where the caller said he had put them.

"It's unlikely that the two speakers, the 911 call speaker and Mr. Blair, are the same person," Purnell said.

In his testimony, Purnell described the complex analysis he performed on the 911 calls and telephone conversations between Blair and his grandmother and Blair and a television reporter that were made while Blair was in jail awaiting trial.

Purnell said Blair and the caller shared some voice characteristics, such as being male, African-American and urban. But he said among other things, their pitch and pacing were different.

Blair, 46, is charged with six counts of first-degree murder in the 2004 deaths of six Kansas City women: Ewing and McKinzie; Patricia Wilson Butler, 45; Darci I. Williams, 25; Carmen Hunt, 40; and Claudette Juniel, 31.

Charges against Blair in two other slayings - those of Nellia Harris, 33, and Sandra Reed, 47 - were dismissed in October. Harris, unlike the other victims, was killed in 2003.

Blair agreed to a nonjury trial before Jackson County Judge Circuit John R. O'Malley in exchange for prosecutors not seeking the death penalty. Prosecutors also earlier agreed to dismiss charges against Blair in two other killings, three rapes and an assault.

Blair has denied involvement in the killings.

In the 911 calls, which were played by the defense in the courtroom Thursday, the caller, who seems to have a slight accent, tells the dispatcher immediately in the first call that he wants to report a dead body. He tells precisely where the body can be found, down to the color of the house.

"How do you know a dead body is there?" the dispatcher asks.

"I put it there," the caller responds.

When asked to give his name, the caller, says, "Oh, no," and then repeats where the body is.

"Look up under the branches under the bushes by the alley," he says. "It's an abandoned house. It's red." He says the body has been there for two months.

When asked if he knows the victim's name, he says he doesn't.

"She's a prostitute."

So were the other two, he says.

"You killed them also?"

"Yeah."

The dispatcher asks how he killed them. "You strangled her?"

The caller hangs up.

On the second call, which came in the next day, the caller says he wants to report two more bodies of prostitutes. He calls them "scum."

"It's a disgrace," he says. He says one of the bodies has been there a week and is starting to stink. He refuses to give his name, but says he can be referred to as "Scott," and that he will call the next day. He says there are six more bodies to be found.

On cross-examination, Assistant Prosecutor Michael Hunt asked Purnell if the caller could have been disguising his voice because "he's talking to police and telling them about six people he's killed."

"When he's talking to his grandma, the consequences are a whole lot different than when he's talking to the police about six murders he committed," Hunt said.

Purnell said the caller could have been disguising his voice, and acknowledged that he had never performed such an analysis before for court proceedings. He had only done them in the classroom.

 
 

Terry Blair avoids death penalty by agreeing to trial without jury

By Joe Lambe, The Kansas City Star

February 2, 2008

Jackson County prosecutors agreed today to no longer seek the death penalty against a man charged with murdering six women whose bodies were found along the Prospect Corridor.

As part of the deal, prosecutors also permanently dismissed charges for two other murders, three rapes and an assault.

In exchange, Terry A. Blair, 46, agreed to a non-jury trial before a judge.

At a hearing this morning, Jackson County judge John O’Malley approved the agreement, which is similar to that given last year to serial killer Lorenzo Gilyard.

Gilyard, also tried before O’Malley, was convicted last year of strangling six women in 1986 and 1987 and sentenced to life without parole.

Based on DNA evidence, Gilyard was originally charged with murdering 13 women but prosecutors elected to try only seven cases. O’Malley found there was not enough evidence in one of those to convict.

Blair’s trial is scheduled to start March 10 on the six murders. All those cases were connected by 911 calls to police that helped them locate the bodies in the corridor between July and September of 2004.

 
 

Suspect in slayings agrees to non-jury trial to avoid death

The Kansas City Star

February 1, 2008

Associated Press

Jackson County prosecutors again are making a deal with a suspected serial killer.

This time, the suspect is Terry Blair, who is being allowed to avoid the death penalty in exchange for him agreeing to be tried by a judge instead of a jury, The Kansas City Star reported on its Web site Friday.

Blair, 46, is charged with the 2004 slayings of six women, whose bodies were dumped in Kansas City neighborhoods frequented by drug addicts and prostitutes. His trial is scheduled to start March 10.

Jackson County Circuit Judge John O'Malley approved the agreement between Blair and prosecutors at a hearing. The agreement is similar to one allowed last year for Lorenzo Gilyard, who went on to be sentenced to life without parole for strangling six women in 1986 and 1987.

A spokesman for the Jackson County prosecutor's office did not immediately return an e-mail or phone message from The Associated Press on Friday.

Blair's attorneys had asked the judge to dismiss the murder charges or forbid the death penalty in the case, saying investigators' handling of the evidence had kept the defense from being able to do its job.

For example, they said videotape footage showing someone dumping one of the bodies sat for three years at FBI headquarters in Washington, D.C., before they were able to look at it.

O'Malley denied the attorneys' requests at a hearing in September but scolded investigators.

The six slayings that Blair is accused of committing were connected by 911 calls to police that helped them locate the bodies in 2004.

Blair is charged with the deaths of Sheliah McKinzie, 38; Patricia Wilson Butler, 45; Darci I. Williams, 25; Anna Ewing, 42; Carmen Hunt, 40; and Claudette Juniel, 31. The women were all strangled.

Charges against Blair in two other slayings — those of victims Nellia Harris, 33, and Sandra Reed, 47 — were dismissed by O'Malley in October. Harris, unlike the other victims, was killed in 2003.

Blair was charged in McKinzie's death in September 2004 after semen left on the victim's body led investigators to link him to the crime. Three months later, charges were added in the other women's deaths.

At the time of his arrest, Blair was on parole after serving 21 years for the 1982 murder of Angela Monroe, his pregnant ex-girlfriend and the mother of two of his children.

 
 

Prosecutors seek death for accused Kansas City serial killer

May 24, 2005

An accused serial killer charged with eight women's deaths will face the death penalty if convicted, it was announced Tuesday.

Jackson County Prosecutor Michael Sanders filed papers outlining aggravating circumstances in each woman's killing that qualify Terry Blair for capital punishment.

"This decision not just represents the desire of the prosecutor's office but also the desire of the family members standing here today," Sanders said.

Blair, 43, has been charged in the deaths of eight women whose bodies were found last year in Kansas City neighborhoods frequented by drug addicts and prostitutes.

Sanders said two factors qualify Blair for the death penalty. First, his prior record of murder; he spent 21 years behind bars for killing his pregnant ex-girlfriend. And second, the alleged killings were "outrageously or wantonly vile, horrible or inhuman."

Blair is charged with killing Sheliah McKinzie, 38; Patricia Wilson Butler, 45; Darci I. Williams, 25; Anna Ewing, 42; Carmen Hunt, 40; Claudette Juniel, 31; Nellia Harris, 33; and Sandra Reed, 47.

Blair is also accused of raping three other women.

He comes from a family with a long record of violent crime.

Blair's mother killed a man but received probation. One of his brothers was executed for another killing and a half brother was sentenced to life in prison for kidnapping and other charges.

Some family members of victims wiped away tears as they stood at Sanders' side for the announcement.

The prosecutor said there was no dissent among the families of victims.

"Ever since our loved ones were found murdered, that's all we've wanted," said Trish Davis, a daughter of Patricia Wilson Butler. "We've wanted justice."

 
 

Suspected Serial Killer Pleads Not Guilty

Judge Denies Request For Bond

TheKansasCityChannel.com

December 13, 2004

KANSAS CITY, Mo.A Kansas City man accused of killing eight women pleaded not guilty Monday to all charges in the case.

Terry A. Blair, 43, did not speak during a brief arraignment in Jackson County Circuit Court. His attorney also entered not guilty pleas for him to one count of first-degree assault and three counts of forcible rape.

Blair was charged in September with one count of first-degree murder in the death of Sheliah McKinzie, 38. Charges in the deaths of the seven other women were added Dec. 3.

Circuit Judge John R. O'Malley, who had set a $500,000 bond on the first murder charge, denied a request for bond on the other counts. Prosecutors said the bond request was irrelevant because, even if Blair made bond, he would remain in jail for violating parole in a previous homicide case.

O'Malley said he had earlier agreed to allow Blair to appear in court in street clothes, rather than prisoner's jumpsuits, during court proceedings. On Monday, Blair wore a tan sweater and dark pants.

Blair is charged with killing McKinzie; Patricia Wilson Butler, 45; Darci I. Williams, 25; Anna Ewing, 42; Carmen Hunt, 40; Claudette Juniel, 31; Nellia Harris, 33; and Sandra Reed, 47. Police said all the victims lived high-risk lives and their bodies were found in east Kansas City neighborhoods frequented by prostitutes and drug users.

Prosecutors have said DNA evidence linked Blair to McKinzie's death, but they have declined to say how they linked Blair to the other victims. O'Malley has issued a gag order on Blair and attorneys in the case.

KMBC reported that several relatives of victims filled rows in the courtoom. Blair's son was also there.

"They don't have anything, so I'm not worried about it. I'm really not worried about it. If they do find him guilty, it'll be off press, not evidence because they don't have any of that," said Marcel Johnson.

When Blair was arrested in September, he was on parole for the 1982 murder of Angela Monroe, his pregnant ex-girlfriend and the mother of two of his children.

 
 

Suspected Kansas City serial killer has family with history of crime

September 21, 2004

Terry Blair had a brother who was executed for committing murder. His mother fatally shot a man, but got off with probation. A half brother is serving two life sentences plus 240 years for an assortment of charges, including kidnapping and forcible sodomy.

Blair himself has spent 21 years behind bars for murder and now is accused of slaying Sheliah McKinzie, 38. She is one of six women whose bodies were found on vacant property in an 18-block area east of downtown.

Police believe the deaths are the work of the same killer and have asked prosecutors to charge Blair, 43, with the other five slayings as well as in three assault and rape cases.

Even in the prison world, where it's not unusual for siblings to serve at the same time, the Blair family is considered unusual — if not rare.

John Fougere, in his seven years with the Missouri Department of Corrections, has only heard of one other family that comes even close to the criminal history of the Blairs.

Roy Ramsey Jr. was executed in April 1999 for killing a suburban Kansas City couple in 1988. Prosecutors say he held the couple at gunpoint while his brother, Billy Ramsey, ransacked the house. Roy Ramsey then took the couple into a bedroom and shot them at close range.

Roy Ramsey later said he was to blame for the family's long criminal history. As the second oldest, he taught his brothers to steal. At the time of his execution, six of Ramsey's 10 brothers were in prison, three on murder charges. Another was murdered shortly after he finished his prison term.

"That was a real eye opener back then," Fougere said, "and this one seems to be similar."

Residents of the neighborhood where the bodies were found wondered whether Blair, who was arrested on a parole violation, would be charged. Five of the bodies were found over a span of three days earlier this month; the first victim was found in July.

He was paroled seven months ago, four years shy of serving his full 25-year sentence for killing his pregnant ex-girlfriend, whom he was angry with because she was working as a prostitute.

Of the five identified victims, all had faced drug charges and three had prostitution or solicitation convictions.

Jackson County Prosecutor Mike Sanders said Blair, the fourth oldest of 10 children, is eligible for the death penalty because of his conviction for the 1982 murder of Angela Monroe, also the mother of two of his children.

His mother, Janice Blair, raised her children in what Terry Blair later described to a parole officer as poverty. She went no further in school than ninth grade and suffered from mental illness, court records show.

On Aug. 16, 1978, according to prosecutors, Janice Blair shot and killed Elton E. Gray with a .38 caliber revolver. She entered an Alford plea, meaning she did not admit wrongdoing but acknowledged the government had enough evidence to convict her.

Janice Blair was sentenced to five years probation. As a condition of parole, she was directed to receive outpatient counseling, therapy and psychiatric treatment. Court records showed a defense of mental disease or defect was possible but presented problems for the defense.

Fougere, the corrections spokesman, called the sentence unusually light. Court records offered no explanation, and Tom Cox, the attorney who represented her, could not recall the case...

The next year, one of her children, Walter Blair Jr., was charged in a murder-for-hire scheme.

Walter Blair, police said, met a man in jail who offered him $6,000 to kill a woman before she could testify at the man's rape trial. Katherine Jo Allen, 21, was the alleged victim.

According to court records, Walter Blair confessed to abducting Allen from her apartment, taking her to a vacant lot and shooting her as she begged for her life...Walter Blair later recanted and his clemency request raised questions about the credibility of the state's chief witness. He was executed in 1993.

Another of Janice Blair's children, Clifford Miller, was sentenced the next year to two life terms, plus 240 years.

The sentence stemmed from the 1992 abduction of a woman from a bar. After shooting the woman in the arm, prosecutors said Miller drove her to an abandoned house where he beat her until she passed out.

She was hospitalized for more than two months, recovering from the gunshot wound, a fractured skull, a broken jaw and smashed cheekbones.

Almost a year later, a friend persuaded the victim to go to a bar, where she saw her attacker. Miller was arrested and later charged with counts that included kidnapping and forcible sodomy.

A murder suspect with a family history of violence, such as Blair, does not surprise Steve Egger, a criminology professor at the University of Houston-Clear Lake and author the "The Need to Kill: Inside the World of a Serial Killer."

"Once you have someone socialized into a culture of violence," Egger said, "they learn to express themselves in a violent manner and it becomes second nature."

 

 

 
 
 
 
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