Murderpedia

 

 

Juan Ignacio Blanco  

 

  MALE murderers

index by country

index by name   A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

  FEMALE murderers

index by country

index by name   A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

 

 

 
   

Murderpedia has thousands of hours of work behind it. To keep creating new content, we kindly appreciate any donation you can give to help the Murderpedia project stay alive. We have many
plans and enthusiasm to keep expanding and making Murderpedia a better site, but we really
need your help for this. Thank you very much in advance.

   

 

 

Tony Leslie FRY

 
 
 
 
 

 

 

 

 
 
 
Classification: Murderer
Characteristics: Robbery
Number of victims: 1
Date of murder: February 21, 1994
Date of birth: 1975
Victim profile: Leland A. Jacobs, 42 (car salesman)
Method of murder: Shooting (.22-caliber handgun)
Location: Chesterfield County, Virginia, USA
Status: Executed by lethal injection in Virginia on February 4, 1999
 
 
 
 
 

Supreme Court of Virginia

 
opinion 950673
 
 
 
 
 
 

On February 21, 1994 Tony Fry and his accomplice, 17-year-old Bradford Hinson, used a .22 caliber weapon to shoot and kill Leland Jacobs, a Chesterfield County 42-year-old car salesman. Fry had lured Jacobs from his Ford dealership under the ruse that Fry's grandmother wanted to buy a 1994 Ford Explorer.

Leland Jacobs was robbed, shot eleven times, tied to the rear bumper of the Explorer with his necktie and dragged down a dirt road 777 feet into the woods while still alive.

About 15 minutes after the murder, a police officer who had a warrant for Fry's arrest for another crime had a tip that Fry frequented the area where Jacobs was killed and came upon Fry and Hinson as they were leaving the scene of the murder. Fry confessed when he was arrested.

 
 

Tony Fry and his accomplice, 17-year-old Bradford Hinson used a .22 caliber weapon to shoot and kill Leland Jacobs, a 42-year-old car salesman whom Fry had lured from his Ford dealership with the ruse that  Fry's grandmother wanted to buy a 1994 Ford Explorer and lived in southern Chesterfield. 

Leland was robbed, shot eleven times, tied to the rear bumper of the Explorer with his necktie and dragged down a dirt road 777 feet into the woods while still alive. 

About 15 minutes after the murder, a police officer who had a warrant for Fry's arrest for another crime had a tip that Fry frequented the area where Jacobs was killed and came upon Fry and Hinson as they were leaving the scene of the murder. 

Fry confessed when he was arrested.  In addition to the death penalty, Fry also received a 50 year sentence for the robbery and an eight year sentence for 2 counts of use of a firearm related to Jacobs' death. 

Hinson was convicted of the 1st-degree murder of Jacobs, robbery and 2 counts of use of a firearm and received an 88 year sentence. 

Fry also gave a confession detailing a long series of robberies, arson of churches and houses, burglaries and grave robbing. 

Chesterfield police testified at Fry's sentencing that when Fry was arrested shortly after Jacobs' murder, he admitted robbing 3 churches in the Matoaca area, including Greenwood Presbyterian Church, of which he was a member. 

He also confessed to torching 2 vacant homes in Chesterfield and pulling fire alarms at various local facilities. 

Fry also admitted robbing a grave off Reedy Branch Road and stealing parts of a man's skull.  He left a jawbone in a friend's apartment, where it was found by police. 

In 1995, Fry waived all further appeals but in 1996 changed his mind. 

 
 

Tony Leslie Fry, 23, 99-02-04, Virginia

In Jarratt, a man convicted of killing a car salesman whose bullet- riddled body was tied to a truck bumper and dragged down a dirt road was executed by injection Thursday night.

Tony Leslie Fry, 23, pleaded guilty to murder and robbery in the February 1994, slaying of Leland A. Jacobs, who worked for a Richmond-area Ford dealership.

In a final statement, Fry said he was "sorry for what I've done, and I have made peace with myself."

Jacobs was shot 11 times with a .22-caliber handgun. His necktie was tied to the rear bumper of the Explorer. A medical examiner testified that Jacobs probably was still alive when he was dragged.

A police officer who had a warrant for Fry's arrest in an unrelated case spotted Fry and an accomplice, then 17-year-old Bradford A. Hinson, leaving the scene and stopped them. Fry confessed to the killing when he was arrested.

Hinson was convicted of 1st-degree murder and robbery and is serving an 88-year sentence.

Fry becomes the 2nd condemned inmate to be put to death in Virginia this year, and the 61st overall since the state resumed capital punishment in 1982. Only Texas, with 167 executions (also since 1982), has executed more people.

(sources: Associated Press and Rick Halperin)

  


 

Virginia execution

Feb. 1, 1999

In Richmond, a man scheduled to be executed Thursday for murdering a Chesterfield County car salesman lost his last appeal Monday to the U.S. Supreme Court.

By a 7-2 vote, the court rejected Tony Fry's emergency request and formal appeal.

Fry's lawyers have said he does not plan to ask Gov. Jim Gilmore for clemency. That would mean he has no appeal options left before his execution.

Fry, 23, pleaded guilty to capital murder in the February 1994 robbery and shooting death of Leland A. Jacobs, a car salesman who was accompanying Fry on a test drive. Fry shot Jacobs 11 times, then helped a companion tie Jacobs to the back of a vehicle and drag his body down a dirt road.

A medical examiner testified that Jacobs probably was still alive when he was dragged.

(source: Associated Press)

 
 

Virginia execution

Feb. 3, 1999

After a plea from Pope John Paul II last week, Missouri Gov. Mel Carnahan spared the life of a triple murderer facing execution -- but Virginia death row inmate Tony Leslie Fry says he has no illusions that Gov. Jim Gilmore will spare his.

"I honestly feel that he wouldn't grant the clemency petition and that's why I didn't file one," said Fry, 23, who was reached by telephone in the death house of the Greensville Correctional Center yesterday.

He said that since he went on death row in January 1995, 36 inmates have been executed and two have received commutations. "I didn't think there'd be no chance," he said. The 2, Joseph Payne and William Saunders, are now serving life sentences.

Fry is scheduled to die by injection tomorrow for the 1994 slaying of a car salesman. The U.S. Supreme Court has turned him down and Gilmore is his last hope. Yet Fry is the 2nd Virginia condemned man in recent months to refuse to ask Gilmore for mercy.

Last December, Kevin Dwayne Cardwell did not seek clemency because his lawyer said Cardwell "did not think it would succeed and that, as he put it, (he) wanted to depart with a sense of dignity."

Including the recent commutation of Darrell Mease's death sentence in Missouri, there have been 38 death sentence commutations across the nation since 1976, when the U.S. Supreme Court permitted capital punishment to resume, according to the Death Penalty Information Center.

More than 500 executions have taken place during the same period.

Of the 38 commutations, three were by then-Virginia Gov. L. Douglas Wilder and 2 by then-Gov. George Allen. Gilmore, once a prosecutor and now more than a year in office, has yet to commute a death sentence.

Fry admits to killing Leland A. Jacobs, 42, a car salesman with Bennett Ford, on Feb. 21, 1994.

He and an accomplice, Bradford A. Hinson, took Jacobs on a test drive. Jacobs was shot 11 times and then, while still alive, was tied to the rear bumper with his tie and dragged more than 700 feet.

Hinson is serving an 88-year sentence after being convicted of the 1st-degree murder of Jacobs, robbery and 2 counts of using a firearm in the commission of a felony.

Fry said he is sorry for what he has done. He said that several weeks ago he wrote the family of his victim to tell them "I was sorry that it happened and that I wish that I could go back and change what happened."

He said he hopes to visit with his grandmother, 2 aunts, lawyers and clergy tomorrow.

Fry said, "Since I've been on death row I've seen all these people that I've known, and even people that I haven't known, personally, I've seen them executed."

He said, "I see the reality of this....I'm prepared to die. I've been preparing for a while now.

"The United States Supreme Court turned me down Monday. So, I know now that nothing can basically stop this execution and I know now that Thursday night at 9 o'clock I'm going to be executed," he said.

David Botkins, spokesman for Attorney General Mark L. Early, said, "Of all the murderers on Virginia's death row, Tony Fry's crime was one the most predatory, horrific and brutal. It was cold-blooded and calculating."

(source: Richmond Times-Dispatch)

 
 

Virginia execution

Feb. 4, 1999

In Jarratt, a man convicted of killing a car salesman whose bullet-riddled body was tied to a truck bumper and dragged down a dirt road was executed by injection Thursday night.

Tony Leslie Fry, 23, pleaded guilty to murder and robbery in the February 1994, slaying of Leland A. Jacobs, who worked for a Richmond-area Ford dealership.

In a final statement, Fry said he was "sorry for what I've done, and I have made peace with myself."

Jacobs was shot 11 times with a .22-caliber handgun. His necktie was tied to the rear bumper of the Explorer. A medical examiner testified that Jacobs probably was still alive when he was dragged.

A police officer who had a warrant for Fry's arrest in an unrelated case spotted Fry and an accomplice, then 17-year-old Bradford A. Hinson, leaving the scene and stopped them. Fry confessed to the killing when he was arrested.

Hinson was convicted of 1st-degree murder and robbery and is serving an 88-year sentence

Fry becomes the 2nd condemned inmate to be put to death in Virginia this year, and the 61st overall since the state resumed capital punishment in 1982. Only Texas, with 167 executions (also since 1982), has executed more people.

Fry also becomes the 13th condemned prisoner to be executed this year in the USA, and the 513th overall since America resumed executions on Jan. 17, 1977.

(sources: Associated Press and Rick Halperin)

 
 

Tony Leslie Fry 

On October 3, 1994 Tony Leslie Fry pled guilty to the murder of Leland A. Jacobs.  Fry was 19 years old at the time when the crime was committed. During the sentencing part of the trial, Fry presented a large amount of mitigating evidence.  He claimed his age, his attitude toward police and the crime, his family background and the fact that he did not supply the murder weapon were all factors which displayed that the death penalty was not a suitable sentence. 

Fry was abandoned by both of his parents as a child and had been raised by his maternal great-grandmother.  As a young boy Fry frequented church and was a member of the choir but did not have a lot of friends.  During high school Fry was placed in a special education class which could handle his emotional disturbance.   He was considered a below average student and had trouble with schoolwork in the low-level classes.  

Two mental health experts testified on Fry's behalf. One psychologists stated that Fry's intelligence was below average, and could only read at a fifth grade level. The psychologist went on to testify that Fry was ˘suffering from a dependent personality disorder and stated that Fry presented some features of void and schizoid personality disorders, but that Fry does not suffer from a mental illness."

The second psychological expert testified "Fry's personality disorders and retarded social development resulted from his abandonment by his mother and the peculiarities of his great-grandparents' household."  However, he concurred with the psychologist that Fry did not have a mental health disorder.   Fry threatened suicide twice during his arrest. 

Both the police and Fry's former employer testified that he was "polite and respectful" with the police continuing on to say that Fry was "forthright about his involvement in Jacobs' murder and the other criminal activities."  The testimony of a fellow inmate of Hinson (who was present at the time of the murder) and Fry stated that "Hinson was the leader of [Fry]." 

However, despite all of the mitigating evidence, the punishment was still fixed as death.  He has been on death row since January 6, 1995.

 

 

 
 
 
 
home last updates contact