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Juan Ignacio Blanco  

 
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MIAO Chung-yi

 
 
 
 
 

 

 

 

 
 
 
Classification: Murderer
Characteristics: Parricide
Number of victims: 1
Date of murder: June 18, 1928
Date of birth: 1900
Victim profile: His wife, Siu Wai-Sheung, 29
Method of murder: Strangulation with cord
Location: Grange-in-Borrowdale, Cumbria, England, United Kingdom
Status: Executed by hanging at Strangeways Prison on December 6, 1928
 
 
 
 
 
 
Two chinese domestic murders by H. J. Lethbridge
 
 
 
 
 
 

Chung Yi Miao was hanged at Strangeways Prison on 6 December 1928 for the murder of his wife. He was a 28-year-old American Chinese with a doctorate in law. He had married his wife, wealthy 29-year-old Wai Sheung, in New York and they had come to Britain for their honeymoon, arriving on the 18th June.

They were stopping at the Borrowdale Gates Hotel, Grange, in the Lake District. On the 19th the couple went for a walk, with Chung returning alone. He gave the staff at the hotel various explanations for his wife's absence, including a story that she had gone shopping in Keswick. At 7.30 that evening Wai's strangled body was discovered beside a riverside footpath.

Police told Chung of his wife's death. 'It is terrible, my wife assaulted, robbed and murdered' he replied. Unfortunately for him, no-one had mentioned assault, robbery or murder. When police searched their bedroom they found, hidden in a film carton, two of his wife's rings, including her wedding ring. It was established that the cord found around his wife's neck was the same cord as the hotel blinds. He was charged with his wife's murder and was tried at Carlisle Assizes in November 1928.

 
 

Miao Chung-Yi

Thomas Pierrepoint hanged Miao at Strangeways Prison on 6th December 1928. Miao was a 28-year-old American Chinese with a doctorate in law. He had married his wife, wealthy 29-year-old Siu Wai-Sheung, in New York on 12th May 1928 after they had met at a dragon dance there on 10th October 1927. After honeymooning in Buffalo, New York, they arrived in Britain for a two month tour of Europe.

After a couple of days in Edinburgh they arrived, on 17th June, at the Borrowdale Gates Private Hotel, Grange-in-Borrowdale, in the Lake District. On the following morning the couple went for a walk and returned in time for lunch. The afternoon saw them leave the hotel, hand in hand, for another walk in the countryside. Miao returned alone a couple of hours later. He gave the staff at the hotel various explanations for his wife's absence, including a story that she had gone shopping in Keswick to buy warmer underwear. At 7.30 that evening, Waii-sheung's strangled body was discovered beside a riverside footpath in Cumma-cutta Wood by farmer Thomas Wilson. Wai-sheung was lying on her back with her legs spread. Her skirt had been raised above her knees and her underwear was torn.

When police searched their bedroom they found, hidden in a film carton, two of his wife's rings, including her wedding ring. It was established that the cord found around his wife's neck was the same cord as used with the hotel blinds. Miao was charged with his wife's murder and his trial began at Carlisle Assizes on 22nd October and lasted three days. The defence was that Wai-sheung had been attacked by a gang of Chinese jewel thieves but this did little to impress the jury and after deliberating for 90 minutes, they returned with a guilty verdict.

Murder-UK.com

 
 

Chinaman to be executed at Manchester

24 November 1928

The execution of Chung Yi MIAO, the young Chinese law student, for  the murder of his wife at Grange-in-Borrowdale, on June 19th, will take place in Strangeways Gaol, Manchester, this being the last prison in which he was confined after sentence to death has been passed upon him at the Carlisle Assizes last month by Mr. Justice HUMPHREYS.

MAIO’s appeal against his conviction was dismissed on Tuesday in  the Court of Criminal Appeal, as reported in Wednesday’s “West Cumberland  Times.”

The arrangements for the execution devolve on the High Sheriff of Cumberland, Mr. Dayrell E. M. CRACKANTHORPE, New Biggin Hall, Westmorland. Mr.  Ernest LIGHTFOOT, solicitor, Carlisle, is the Under-Sheriff.

 
 

Chief Justice Mistaken

Time.com

Monday, Dec. 03, 1928

The Lord Chief Justice of _ England, Baron Hewart, heard last week in London the appeal of one Chung Yi-miao, a Chinese law student whom a lower English court had sentenced to hang for murdering his Chinese wife, also a young student.

Murderer Chung pleaded his own appeal before the Lord Chief Justice. When judgment was about to be pronounced, Chung Yi-miao leaned forward and cupped his hand behind his ear, in order not to miss a word.

Imposing in great wig and majestic robes, Baron Hewart said: "It is impossible to say that there is not ample evidence to find that this appellant committed this crime. Miao is guilty of a diabolical, calculated crime. This appeal is dismissed."

As Murderer Chung Yi-miao was dragged protesting to his cell, meticulous observers noted that the Lord Chief Justice had mistakenly referred to him as "Miao"—apparently supposing that to be his surname. Of course Chinese surnames or "last names" come first, and the Lord Chief Justice should have said, "Chung is guilty," unless His Lordship desired to refer to the prisoner familiarly by his given name, which was Yi-miao, not Miao.

 
 


Miao Chung-Yi and Siu Wai-Sheung