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Juan Ignacio Blanco  

 

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Gordon Stewart NORTHCOTT

 
 
 

 

Deputy District Attorney Redwine says Northcott confessed that he murdered a Mexican boy in the farm house.

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Northcott says, "The Winslow boys were never on my farm. I didn't kill them."

 

 

Deputy District Attorney Redwine says Northcott told him the head of the murdered
Mexican boy was buried on the farm after burning.

 

 

Deputy District Attorney Redwine says he has evidence to send Northcott to the gallows for the murder
of the Winslow boys and that the two little brothers were slain near Wineville. Redwine says he has their bones.

 

 

In going through the photographs from the Gordon Northcott case, I'm struck by how different Northcott looks from one image to another. Sometimes he appears  thoughtful, even bookish. In others, he looks quite demonic. In the undated picture above, probably taken at San Quentin, he seems sensitive and reflective. (Los Angeles Times file photo).

 

 

 

 

Gordon Northcott: "Youth Convicted as Boy-Butcher."

 

 

 

 

C.F. Rayburn, left, and Jack Brown in the drawing room of the Southern Pacific's Owl train as they escort
Gordon Northcott to San Quentin, where he was hanged. (Los Angeles Times file photo).

 

 

Gordon Northcott, right, questions Rex Welch, analytical expert, about bloodstains on a bucket
introduced as evidence in a photograph published Jan. 28, 1929.

 

 

Gordon Stewart Northcott, the opposing batteries of attorneys, his four guards and some of the witnesses at his trial in Riverside for the murder of the Winslow brothers. Seated at the counsel table are, left to right, Deputy District Attorney Earle Redwine; Loyal C. Kelley, associate prosecution counsel; A. H. DeTremaudan, defense attorney; J. McKinley Cameron, defense attorney; David Sokol, defense attorney; Northcott; Norbert Savay, chief defense attorney. The four guards standing at right are, left to right, Deputy Sheriffs T. J. Burn, Ben deCrevecoeur, Carl Raeburn and Tex Boyles. In the background are witnesses and spectators.

 

 

Gordon Northcott ignores his attorneys and argues with the judge, Dec. 5, 1928.
(Los Angeles Times file photo).

 

 

From left, prosecutor Earl (sometimes spelled Earle) Redwine, Loyal Kelley, A.H. de Tremaudan
(sometimes spelled Tremandon), J. McKinley Cameron, David Sokol, Gordon Northcott and Norbert Savay.
(Los Angeles Times file photo).

 

 

Gordon Northcott, left, and Louisa Northcott in court, Dec. 13, 1928. (Los Angeles Times file photo).

 

 

Gordon Northcott led officers to an ash heap containing bones believed to be Walter Collins'
and is aiding a further hunt for the graves of his victims.

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Northcott sitting in his cell at the Los Angeles County Jail on December 1, 1928, the cell which was occupied by William Edward Hickman, the "Fox". Here he was relentlessly questioned. He said, "I'm a misfit, and once a misfit always a misfit."

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Gordon Stewart Northcott whiles away his hours in jail December 4, 1928, by playing cards alone and trying to read his future in the way the cards fall. He had recently confessed that nine boys were slain on the "murder farm," five by his own hand. He blames one killing on Sanford Clark. In his right hand he holds a fateful card, the joker. "There's always a joker in the game when I play," he said.

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Gordon Stewart Northcott in Los Angeles County Jail. He is taking castor oil.

 

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