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Ulf OLSSON

 
 
 
 
 

 

 

 

 


A.K.A.: "The Man With The Dog"
 
Classification: Murderer
Characteristics: Abduction - Rape
Number of victims: 2
Date of murder: March/August 1989
Date of arrest: June 23, 2004
Date of birth: December 19, 1951
Victims profile: HelÚn Nilsson (female, 10) / Jannica Ekblad (female prostitute, 26)
Method of murder: Beating with a blunt instrument
Location: H÷rby/Malm÷, Sweden
Status: Sentenced to life April 2005. Transferred to psychiatric hospital. Committed suicide on January 10, 2010
 
 
 
 
 
 
photo gallery
 
 
 
 
 
 

Ulf Olsson (1951 - ), also known as HelÚnmannen ("the HelÚn man") in Sweden, was convicted for the murders of 10-year old HelÚn Nilsson and 26-year old Jannica Ekblad in 1989.

Found after a DNA-test in 2004 (a test series including 28 other men), Olsson was convicted to psychiatric care in 2005. Although he was first brought to the attention of the police during a private dinner in 2002, he had been in contact with two different police officers through anonymous letters and phone calls since only a couple of months after the murders.

The investigation is the second-largest in Swedish history, only surpassed by the investigation of the 1986 assassination of Swedish prime minister Olof Palme.

The murders

HelÚn Nilsson

HelÚn Nilsson was abducted on the night of March 20, 1989 and her body was found six days later. She had been alive for a couple of days after the abduction and had been raped. A number of leads were followed over the years but Olsson was not of any interest to the police until in 2002, when a police investigator involved with a recent re-opening of the case was informed of a man (Olsson) that had been suspected by the locals around the time of the murder. A tips was filed for him and in 2004 he was one of 29 men that were asked for a voluntary DNA sample. The test result indicated Olsson as the murderer with an error probability of one in 43 millions.

Jannica Ekblad

Jannica Ekblad was a prostitute in Malm÷. She was found dead on August 4, 1989, and since Olsson, who has been convicted of killing her, claims he has never met her, the known details about her last hours in life are scarce. She did talk to a female prostitute friend through her house phone trying to have her follow Jannica and a man to a location outside of Malm÷, but the friend was unable to. No names were used, but it is believed that the man was Olsson.

Jannica also visited a male friend of hers, who would occasionally provide her with heroin. Jannica made a short visit and appeared worried. She was seen leaving together with a man and no later observations were made of her. In 2004, large amounts of Jannica's blood were found in the summer cabin that belonged to Olsson at the time of the murder and together with his sperm being found in her vagina and other evidence, this enabled the conviction of him.

Connection between the murders

The police technician responsible for the two murders was in an early stage convinced that the same killer was responsible for the two murders. Although there were clear differences in the two victims (a young girl and a prostitute), other parameters such as the type of location in which the bodies were discovered, the combination of strangulation and massive force against their heads as well as the presence of dog's hair on both bodies, made the investigators suspect there was a connection. Before the proofs against Olsson had been collected in 2004, however, there was no established connection between the murders.

Death

At 5:00 am CET on 10 January 2010, Ulf Olsson published a post on his blog where he stated "the best thing for me is simply to die, rather than to sit here as a living dead" (Swedish: det bństa f÷r mig ńr helt enkelt att bara fň d÷, ńn att sitta hńr som en levande d÷d).

At approximately 6:15 am CET the same morning, Ulf Olsson was found lifeless by staff of the psychiatric clinic where he was situated. Officials of the psychiatric clinic confirmed that he had committed suicide.

Wikipedia.org

 
 

The HelÚn murder (Swedish HelÚnmordet), is a sadistic murder on a 10-year old girl named HelÚn Nilsson in H÷rby, Sweden in March 1989. The murderer, Ulf Olsson, the so-called HelÚn man (HelÚnmannen) was convicted in April 2005 having been found after a DNA test in 2004.

HelÚn was abducted on the evening of March 20, 1989. She had decided to meet with two friends outside a grocery store, but they never met.

Her body was found six days later in the woods about 20 kilometres outside H÷rby. It turned out that the girl had been alive for a couple of days after the abduction. The murder remained unsolved for the following years and attracted media attention every now and then.

The murderer was first brought to the attention of the police on a private dinner. A police officer mentioned that she was involved with the investigation of the HelÚn murder and this prompted a remark from one of the guests about a former colleague of hers. Supposedly, there had been a lot of talking going on about this man at the time of the HelÚn murder. The police who received the tips filed it although it was not enough for an investigation. As a result however, he would later be included in the group of 29 men who were asked to leave DNA-samples.

In December, 2004, the murderer was declared guilty and in April the following year he was sentenced to life, even though he had been found mentally ill. The verdict was appealed and the second authority determined the mental condition to be severe enough to warrant psychiatric care.

Details of the abduction

Not everything is known about the details of her abduction, but some events were determined by the police investigation.

HelÚn had decided to meet two friends of her outside a grocery store at 19.00, but failing to find them there she had made a short walk around the block. She met a couple of friends of her sister, who informed her about two girls waiting outside the store. Upon looking in that direction, HelÚn and the sister's friends could see the girls leaving the parking lot, and HelÚn ran after them. This is the last known observation of HelÚn Nilsson. Although the police made major efforts to determine where she had been abducted it could never be determined whether it occurred outside the store or on her way home, if she had decided to return home after her friends had left her.

Shortly after 20.00, the time when HelÚn should have returned home, the family was getting worried that she was not home, since HelÚn's friends had been there to ask for her. A search started and more and more people became involved in looking for the girl. At 22.10, the police was informed and over the following days, the disappearance attracted a lot of media attention.Five independent witnesses have seen a young man, 20-25 years old, at the same place and time as HelÚn disappeared. One of them saw him force a little girl into his car. The witness has confirmed that the man did not look like the judged man.

Arrest

A number of arrests were made over the years. At March 22, only two days after the abduction and while the search was still on, a man living in the same area as HelÚn was interrogated by the police and had his home searched. He could not present an alibi and he was never informed of being suspected of the crime.

In 2002, the case was reopened with the intention of reviewing all the interrogation transcripts, letters and other available data. One revisited lead consisted of a man who was reported to have attempted a couple of rapes during the 1980's and who lived in the area. He had been with his cousin during the day of HelÚn's disappearing and the two men presented very different views on what they had been doing on that day. During the new investigations, a number of girls who had lived in the area and been 10 years old some time during the eighties were questioned and six of them mentioned being harassed or assaulted by the man.

It could be established in 1989 that the two men had been at the grocery store at the same time that HelÚn was in the area and they had been spotted in their car, signalling with the full beam and in other aspects behaving "very strange".

Several other observations of the two cousins prompted the investigators to detain the two men in 2002. Eventually, the prosecutor determined that there was no reason to keep them in custody and they were let go.

Use of new technology

A small amount of sperm was found on HelÚn's body and was sent to the forensic laboratory in Link÷ping. In 1989, however, the techniques used were not advanced enough to be able to get any information out of such small amounts but the sample was frozen. In 2002, during the aforementioned reopening of the case, the sample was sent to Forensic Science Service in Birmingham, UK and in August 2003, the DNA profile was received.

In April 2004, a group of 29 men that had appeared in the investigation was selected. The purpose was to conduct interrogations and to ask the men to voluntarily provide DNA samples. There were no priority differences within the group apart from the strategy of starting with those living closest. It had been rumoured over the years that Swedish serial killer Thomas Quick was involved in the murder and although the police had no interest in him, he was allowed to leave a sample by his own initiative in order to rule him out.

A match was reported on June 23, 2004 and an arrest was made the same evening.

Wikipedia.org

 
 

Ulf Olsson - AKA "The Man With The Dog"

Convicted in 2004 for two accounts of murder in the first degree.

Olsson's first victim was 10-year old HelÚn Nilsson from the small southern community of H÷rby. HelÚn disappeared from outside a convenience store, the 20th of March 1989. Six days later her body was found a couple of miles from the place of abduction, in Tollarp.

The forensic evidence showed that she'd been held captive for several days, being severally beaten and raped multiple times. Finally she'd been killed, put in a garbage bag and dumped in the woods.

Later the same year, the 2nd of August 1989, the 26-year old prostitute Jannica Ekblad disappears. She'd come home to her grandmother's house in Malm÷ to fix herself up for a date with a customer. This is the last time Jannica is seen alive. The next day police found her naked body close to a rest stop outside of Vedema. Her death is soon thereafter linked to the death of HelÚn Nilsson.

Even though the major police effort the killer of HelÚn and Jannica eludes capture. Forensics hadn't revealed anything helpful other than a sample of badly degraded DNA, which at the time was impossible to trace.

Two years after the murders, the 6th of April 1991, detective Alf Andersson receives a telephone call traced to a pay phone in Malm÷. The information given by the caller leads police to believe that this is the killer calling, since some of the details from the classified autopsy reports are told. The caller says: "I'm so lonely. That's why I did it. It just happened to be HelÚn. She was just there. And Jannica, I got so angry that I killed her. I strangled them and beat them to death." The caller promises the detective to call again the next day, which he never does.

More than 13 years later, the 1st of June 2004, detective Alf Andersson receives a CD-ROM with a letter of confession. It reads: "Hadn't I been bullied while in H÷rby Elementary School this would never had happened. I killed HelÚne & Jannica. I did it alone." The last statement that the killer acted alone was a direct response to the capture of two suspects the year before.

In 2003 two pedophiles with prior convictions for sexual advances towards underage girls had been arrested and interrogated for several weeks. When they later were cleared of suspicion it didn't take many months before the killer once again contacted the police.

The police continued their efforts, now working from a list of 29 suspects who were rounded up and had DNA-samples taken. The forensic sciences had evolved considerably since the first investigation so the samples could now be matched to the one taken from the original crime scene.

The killer, Ulf Olsson, was on this list as number 28. He'd been put on the list as a lucky fluke. An investigator who had worked on the case back in 1989 was on a dinner party when people got to talk about the murder. One of guests said that she'd been distraught with the murder of HelÚn and that she'd always suspected one of her former colleagues, Ulf Olsson, for the murder.

The investigator took the tip seriously and Olsson was placed on the list of possible suspects. The results of Olsson's DNA-sample came back from the forensic lab the 23rd of June 2004. The same evening Olsson was arrested for the murders.

A dark picture started to form with Olsson's testimony. Olsson was born in the small rural town of H÷÷r, about 13 kilometers from H÷rby where he later moved. His upbringing was strict and filled with violence.

While his brothers managed to put the actions of their abusive parents behind them, Ulf couldn't. He became the local "odd-ball", often seen in the woods surrounding H÷rby where he spent the most of his time, afraid of being beaten if he came home. When Ulf and his brothers got a baby sister the abuse lessened and he managed to pull his life together somewhat.

He finished school with mediocre grades in all classes but art class in which he excelled. During his school years he had a hard time connecting with children his own age and was often found playing cowboys & indians with the younger children.

After graduating he got a job as an errand boy for a local business. The employment lasted for a year but was terminated when he didn't show up for work for several weeks. After being fired he started drifting around, taking odd-jobs where he could find them, but soon suffered a complete mental breakdown and was sent to an assylum.

After two months of treatment he was deamed fit to return to society. He held jobs at a slaughter house and a tool manufacturer for about two years until his mental condition started to assert itself again. He wanted to get away and joined the crew of a merchant ship. His condition only worsened and when he returned to Sweden he tried to go back to the assylum but was denied treatment.

During his years as a sailor he claims he killed a man in Thailand who looked at him the wrong way (which has yet to be confirmed or denied), that he joined and later escaped the French Foreign Legion & made a trip in a rubber dingy tied to a passenger ship between Sweden and Germany. These strange claims have since the day of his capture been made every now and then.

Sometime after his return to Sweden, Olsson married but the marriage soon ended in divorce. Also his second marriage ended shortly after it began. He now lived in a small cabin outside of H÷÷r. The cabin has later been confirmed as the killing site of both HelÚn and Jannica.

The year after the murders Olsson sold the cabin and moved to the small town of Vimmerby. There he became known as "The Man With The Dog", since he never was seen without his companion, a black dog. People thought he was kind of unsetteling to be around but no one could say why they thought so. Everyone knew who he was, but no one knew him personally.

In 1994 he was suspected of several accounts of arson in Vimmerby but was later cleared. He was however convicted of vandalism when he put sharp screws on the road causing a lot of cars to blow their tires.

During his years in Vimmerby it's also been suggested that Olsson is behind the disapperance and murder of a local 6-year old girl called Jasmina. He has hinted this himself several times but seems to be using the possibility of this crime as a way to get more media attention - i.e. it's believed he won't confess to it. He further claims he has a spotty memory of what happened to HelÚn and Jannica and denied any involvement in their murders for a long time after arrest.

So why did Olsson kill his victims? We know that he was abused as a child. Nothing has been said about him being abused sexually, but eye witness reports from his siblings tell that Ulf was severely beaten on a regular basis. His mother, later claiming that she wanted to protect her son from his father, carried out the beatings since she claims she knew when to stop.

Analysts think this was the start of his hate/dependency relationships towards women. He also showed antisocial tendencies as well as cruelty to what he said was his best friends, animals. He's said himself that he has executed two of his dogs with a long-bladed knife. Olsson was convicted to lifetime imprisonment in a hospital for the criminally insane. He's currently serving his time in media hiatus, refusing to speak to the press.

 
 


 

DNA nails killer ľ probable

July 2, 2004

"Last Thursday morning the telephone rang at the home of HelÚn Nilsson's parents. It was the police. 'We've probably got the man who killed your daughter.'"

So began DN's coverage of the story that has dominated this week's front pages, the rape and murder of a 10 year old girl in the southern Swedish town of H÷rby.

Last week a 52 year old man was arrested for her murder, after DNA profiling matched him to a tiny sample of semen found on her body. But what makes the case so significant is that the murder took place 15 years ago.

On 20th March 1989 HelÚn had arranged to meet her friends outside a shop in H÷rby. She never arrived. For six days Sweden held its breath while police searched for her, but on 26th March a member of the public found her naked body in a plastic bag in a forest 25km from her home. It had been concealed by a mound of stones.

As well as the semen, forensic investigators took hairs, both human and from a dog, from the body and concluded that after being imprisoned for several days HelÚn had been beaten to death with a blunt instrument.

Over the following months and years a number of suspects were questioned, including a Danish rapist, a serial killer and a pair of cousins who were held for almost two months, but none were prosecuted.

The semen sample remained frozen at the State Criminal Technical Laboratory in Link÷ping. But last year it was sent to an English organisation, Forensic Science Service, which had developed a completely new method of analysis. In the autumn, Forensic Science Service returned a full DNA profile of the man the semen came from.

Armed with this new evidence, police began trawling their files for suspects and came up with 29 men whose DNA they wanted to compare with the profile. Among them was the 52 year old, who had only been on the fringes of the investigation for the last two years after renewed media interest had attracted some new tip-offs.

He willingly provided a sample of his DNA and was among the last five suspects to be tested. Last Wednesday Skňne police were informed that his DNA matched the profile and at around 10pm he was arrested at his home in Smňland.

In a press conference the following day, police chief Henrik Malmquist was confident that they had got their man.

"According to the English company which carried out the DNA profiling, the chance is one in fifteen million that it wasn't the 52 year old in custody who left traces on HelÚn Nilsson's body."

Nevertheless, the man denied the murder.

If at the time of his arrest little was known about the man except his age and where he lived, the days which followed brought a surge of revelations. And the undercurrent was that it was more than just his DNA profile that labelled him as the killer.

At the time of the murder the man was living in the H÷rby area, but in 1990 he moved to Smňland. He became known as a loner who was often seen with his dog. He had been in trouble for shoplifting and, according to Svenska Dagbladet, "causing a highway obstruction", after laying nails and screws in a road.

He has a 13 year old son who lives with his mother in another country and he has been campaiging to be allowed to see him. Last year he had a letter about his case published in Expressen and he is said to have sought help from former Prime Minister Carl Bildt.

Monday's tabloids declared that the man was considered to be a suicide risk and was not being given access to newspapers, television or radio. The stories that emerged throughout the rest of the week perhaps justified that decision.

Tuesday focused on the man's somewhat vague links with a man who made pornographic films but Wednesday's headlines will be considerably more damaging. According to a new witness the man is said to have told colleagues that the youngest girl he had had sex with was nine years old.

On Thursday the investigation turned to the man's summer cottage, following an anonymous tip-off to the newspaper Skňnska Dagbladet. The caller apparently provided precise details of where blood-stained clothes and a dead dog were buried. Thursday's Aftonbladet reported that police had found "important evidence", including dog hair, in the cottage.

The paper also revealed that the 52 year old is now a prime suspect for other unsolved murders of young girls in the south of Sweden. Top of the list is the murder of 26 year old Jannica Ekblad, who was also killed in 1989. She was found in the same type of plastic bag and with traces of the same type of dog hair as HelÚn Nilsson, and police have long suspected that the same person killed them.

As for the HelÚn Nilsson case, police chief Henrik Malmquist would not go so far as to say that it had been cleared up.

"But we have never before been so close to solving it," he said.

 
 

1989 double murder suspect denies everything

December 2, 2004

The man accused of killing 10 year old HelÚn Nilsson and 26 year old Jannica Ekblad fifteen years ago denied the charges in Lund district court on Thursday.

But the day's session began in chaos as a man armed with a knife tried to force his way through the security check and into the courtroom.

The man was a 26 year old Malm÷ resident, and Expressen reported that he was tackled by police and security guards who carried him over the street to the police station for questioning.

Police said that the man had no connection with either of the victims' families or to Ulf Olsson, the man accused of the murders. The 26 year old said that it was a coincidence that he had a knife and he had just come to watch the trial. He was released after questioning.

Back in court, Ulf Olsson, 52, took the stand after lunch and the chief prosecutor, Pńr Andersson, began with questions about his childhood.

"There's not much to say," replied Olsson. He said that he had a few friends and was often alone in the forest, as he was interested in nature. He described briefly how he had moved around a lot, and confirmed that in 1989 he was living in the cottage where the murders are said to have taken place.

Olsson admitted that he was often in H÷rby, from where HelÚn was abducted, to visit his sister. But as Aftonbladet reported, he said he could not remember where he was on 20th March 1989, the day she disappeared.

"Did you take HelÚn away?" asked the prosecutor.

"No," replied Olsson. "I've never seen her."

"You have heard the experts testify about the certainty that it is your semen which was found in her."

"I don't know about that. I have no explanation."

"You have seen the pictures of how HelÚn was murdered. Who did it?"

"I don't know," said Olsson.

According to Svenska Dagbladet's Karin Thunberg, Ulf Olsson used few words and spoke very quietly in giving his most common answer: "I have no idea".

Olsson's responses were perhaps more significant given what the judge said to him before the lunch break:

"If it is you who did this, I ask you to tell the court," said Jan Alvň. "Whoever did this cannot expect to be forgiven, nor can he demand to be understood. One can perhaps attain a certain sympathy but it requires courage to talk about such a thing."

"I think that you, Ulf Olsson, should think about that over lunch," he concluded.

However, Alvň's words apparently had little effect. When questioned about the death of Jannica Ekblad - whose blood was found in Olsson's cottage - he denied any involvement and said that someone else must have taken her there and killed her while he slept in the other room.

"Who has been in your cottage and murdered Jannica and cleaned up when you weren't there?" asked the prosecutor.

"I don't know," Olsson replied. "It's just a theory."

Olsson will continue in the witness stand on Friday. Next week his former wife, and a woman with whom he has a child, will testify. The trial is expected to close on 16th December.

 
 

HelÚn murder suspect "claimed to have killed"

December 10, 2004

"Last Thursday morning the telephone rang at the home of HelÚn Nilsson's parents. It was the police. 'We've probably got the man who killed your daughter.'"

So began DN's coverage of the story that has dominated this week's front pages, the rape and murder of a 10 year old girl in the southern Swedish town of H÷rby.

Last week a 52 year old man was arrested for her murder, after DNA profiling matched him to a tiny sample of semen found on her body. But what makes the case so significant is that the murder took place 15 years ago.

On 20th March 1989 HelÚn had arranged to meet her friends outside a shop in H÷rby. She never arrived. For six days Sweden held its breath while police searched for her, but on 26th March a member of the public found her naked body in a plastic bag in a forest 25km from her home. It had been concealed by a mound of stones.

As well as the semen, forensic investigators took hairs, both human and from a dog, from the body and concluded that after being imprisoned for several days HelÚn had been beaten to death with a blunt instrument.

Over the following months and years a number of suspects were questioned, including a Danish rapist, a serial killer and a pair of cousins who were held for almost two months, but none were prosecuted.

The semen sample remained frozen at the State Criminal Technical Laboratory in Link÷ping. But last year it was sent to an English organisation, Forensic Science Service, which had developed a completely new method of analysis. In the autumn, Forensic Science Service returned a full DNA profile of the man the semen came from.

Armed with this new evidence, police began trawling their files for suspects and came up with 29 men whose DNA they wanted to compare with the profile. Among them was the 52 year old, who had only been on the fringes of the investigation for the last two years after renewed media interest had attracted some new tip-offs.

He willingly provided a sample of his DNA and was among the last five suspects to be tested. Last Wednesday Skňne police were informed that his DNA matched the profile and at around 10pm he was arrested at his home in Smňland.

In a press conference the following day, police chief Henrik Malmquist was confident that they had got their man.

"According to the English company which carried out the DNA profiling, the chance is one in fifteen million that it wasn't the 52 year old in custody who left traces on HelÚn Nilsson's body."

Nevertheless, the man denied the murder.

If at the time of his arrest little was known about the man except his age and where he lived, the days which followed brought a surge of revelations. And the undercurrent was that it was more than just his DNA profile that labelled him as the killer.

At the time of the murder the man was living in the H÷rby area, but in 1990 he moved to Smňland. He became known as a loner who was often seen with his dog. He had been in trouble for shoplifting and, according to Svenska Dagbladet, "causing a highway obstruction", after laying nails and screws in a road.

He has a 13 year old son who lives with his mother in another country and he has been campaiging to be allowed to see him. Last year he had a letter about his case published in Expressen and he is said to have sought help from former Prime Minister Carl Bildt.

Monday's tabloids declared that the man was considered to be a suicide risk and was not being given access to newspapers, television or radio. The stories that emerged throughout the rest of the week perhaps justified that decision.

Tuesday focused on the man's somewhat vague links with a man who made pornographic films but Wednesday's headlines will be considerably more damaging. According to a new witness the man is said to have told colleagues that the youngest girl he had had sex with was nine years old.

On Thursday the investigation turned to the man's summer cottage, following an anonymous tip-off to the newspaper Skňnska Dagbladet. The caller apparently provided precise details of where blood-stained clothes and a dead dog were buried. Thursday's Aftonbladet reported that police had found "important evidence", including dog hair, in the cottage.

The paper also revealed that the 52 year old is now a prime suspect for other unsolved murders of young girls in the south of Sweden. Top of the list is the murder of 26 year old Jannica Ekblad, who was also killed in 1989. She was found in the same type of plastic bag and with traces of the same type of dog hair as HelÚn Nilsson, and police have long suspected that the same person killed them.

As for the HelÚn Nilsson case, police chief Henrik Malmquist would not go so far as to say that it had been cleared up.

"But we have never before been so close to solving it," he said.

 
 

Double murder trial delayed for new DNA test

December 16, 2004

The trial of Ulf Olsson, suspected of killing 10 year old HelÚn Nilsson and 26 year old Jannica Ekblad in 1989, took an unexpected turn on Thursday morning as Lund District Court delayed judgement until further DNA testing could be carried out.

The decision effectively splits the case in two. All the evidence against Olsson for murdering HelÚn Nilsson has been presented to the court, but the results of the new DNA analysis - on semen found in Jannica Ekblad - will not be available for "at least ten weeks".

Sydsvenskan described the "irritated discussion between the trial judge Jan Alvň, prosecutor Pńr Andersson and Olsson's defence lawyer Sven Jernryd" which led to the decision. While the prosecutor's view was that the trial could come to a close on Thursday as scheduled, both the judge and Olsson's lawyer disagreed.

They pointed out that if the evidence came in after the trial was concluded and showed that it was not Olsson's semen, there was a risk that the whole thing would have to be rerun.

This, the third attempt at DNA analysis on the semen, will be carried out at a laboratory in Birmingham, England. The first two attempts failed to produce conclusive results.

That the defence lawyer should be staking so much on this last piece of evidence suggests that the odds are stacked against his client.

In an interview with Dagens Nyheter, Christian Diesen, a professor of law, said that "there is no problem for the court to find Ulf Olsson guilty of murder".

Diesen pointed to three strong indications that Olsson was the man behind the crimes.

"The fact that they found Ulf Olsson's semen in HelÚn's body is not proof that he killed her, but it's a very strong indicator that he did it," he said.

"Neither is Jannica's blood in his summer cottage proof that he killed her, but it's similarly strong circumstantial evidence."

The third factor is the numerous anonymous phone calls and letters received by police in the years since the deaths, in which someone is admitting to the crimes.

One of these calls was proven to have come from a telephone card used by Olsson.

"In this context this telephone card is as strong an indicator as the DNA evidence," said Diesen.

"The semen, the blood and the telephone card build a net of independent circumstantial evidence which, together with the lack of an alibi, tie Ulf Olsson to the murders."

However, in court on Thursday morning Olsson's defence lawyer Sven Jernryd read out the profile of the suspect - or suspects - created by police some years ago. Sydsvenskan noted that the profile highlighted clear differences in the two murders.

"The differences are that HelÚn was an inexperienced little schoolgirl while Jannica was an adult, a prostitute and a heroin abuser. The woman's body lay completely in the open while the girl's had been packed in plastic bags."

The trial is now expected to be concluded in March.

 

 

 
 
 
 
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